Happy Authors make Happy Illustrators :)

Another deadline met, another happy author. ūüôā

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Lorraine Dey

http://www.deystudio.com

 

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An illustration from the book I am completing today…

Here is an illustration from “The Christmas Berry” written by Canadian Author¬†Lisa Young and illustrated by Lorraine Dey

TheChristmasBerry_LorraineDey

On to the next book. Keep watching for images I will post from the¬†“Acres Verdes” collection.

Lorraine Dey

http://www.deystudio.com

Illustration Friday – Twirl

This week’s entry for IF is a book cover I did a few years ago. Thought I’d dust it off for the subject of “Twirl”.

By Lorraine Dey

www.deystudio.com

Black and White Art!

I’m working on my B&W art style…

First, I have to say how sorry I am that I have neglected this¬†blog for way too long.¬† I am going to change up the format a little so that it is a easier for me to make regular posts.¬† I will be posting my work in progress, my “Illustration Friday” entries, and news and updates as far as my work and publication efforts go.

This week’s IF image is for the subject “Brigade”. Click on image to view it at a larger size.

I may add interesting things that I have learned in this industry and helpful tips for other illustrators from time to time, but I will be turning my efforts over to my drawing table.¬† I will also be posting sketches that are in progress, letting you in on current projects, and upcoming new projects. I hope you will keep coming back, and please feel free to comment!! ūüėČ Happy Holidays!

Lorraine Dey – author/illustrator

www.deystudio.com

Inside the illustrator’s Studio

Inside the Artist/Illustrator’s Studio

I always find it interesting as an illustrator to see the various work spaces of fellow artists.  We are very similar in that most of our work is done in solitude, we enjoy the work we do, and we are inspired by each other.

However our¬†differences show in our work spaces and how we actually do the work… the tools we use, the reference, and the decor… of course the decor! ūüėČ Just kidding… most of us work amoung stacks of art boards, supplies, paper and books.¬† I know for myself, I work much better if my space is organized somewhat and if things are getting out of hand, I have to take time to get it straightened out before I can really dive into that next project I need to illustrate.

I decided to take you on a mini-tour of a few artist’s studio spaces.¬† I will share some of my own studio images as well as several other artist’s.¬† We will start with mine…

Lorraine Dey’s Studio

Since I do the majority of my finished work on the computer as digital paintings in Adobe Photoshop or vector art in Adobe Illustrator, my studio is predominantly based around my computer set up.  I also have a small art table for my initial sketching and pencil roughs, (although I usually sketch while sitting in my recliner or in a beach chair if possible!)

Fine artists like Todd White paint at their easels while digital artists sit at a computer for hours.

Above photo¬†is Susan Sorell Hill’s studio

Above photo is Mike Weber’s Studio

The studio space is one that truly reflects the style and personality of the artist. They range¬†from the¬†eclectic and fun, to the sophisticated and organized. Check out some of the photo links below for more artist’s studios…

Thanks for visiting.¬† I hope you enjoyed the tours. ūüėČ

Lorraine Dey

illustrator – Deystudio, LLC (www.deystudio.com)
(click on the “about” tab above to see more about Deystudio, LLC)
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This month’s featured blog… “Building a Studio Space”

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Featured image for this month…(from my RF stock portfolio)

Illustration – Portfolio Basics

Illustration –¬†Portfolio Basics

One of the most important “must-have’s” for an illustrator is a professional-looking portfolio. Wether you are a student with no experience or a seasoned professional, your portfolio needs to show your best foot forward. It is the first impression given of you and your work, talent and style,¬†and you only get one chance to make that first impression!

I’ve compiled a few links to articles discussing the basics of setting up your best portfolio impression, and I will add some of my own tid-bits based on my experience over the years in past positions as an Art Director, designer¬†and freelance illustrator.

Here is some valuable reading on art portfolios from Computerarts.

Portfolio “How-To’s”.

Portfolio tips from children’s book editor Cheryl Klein.

Preparing a Student College Portfolio.

You will definitely want to be specific in directing your portfolio to the specific area you would like to focus on.

As a children’s book illustrator and a graphic designer/technical illustrator, I have several different portfolios.¬† If I am showing my work to an art rep who promotes to children’s publishing, I will obviously show the specific portfolio for my children’s illustration.¬† Trust me, they do not want to see highly technical renderings of machine parts, or the latest and greatest ad you just completed for that fortune 500 company.¬† I have seen artists lump everything together into one portfolio and show that one portfolio to everyone.¬† All it does is dilute your work and the viewer will have a difficult time sorting out and remembering exactly what it is you do that can be of use to them.

Start out with a great looking case, even if it doesn’t cost a bundle of money make sure it is in good, clean condition.

With a “screwpost” portfolio you can control the amount of page inserts in the book.¬† For illustrators, try to keep it at 10 to 12 of your absolute best work.

Try to get a professional’s, (or 2) opinion on what your “best” work is.¬† Sometimes we have a hard time choosing for ourselves.¬† I was lucky enough to sit down for a portfolio review with award winning children’s illustrator E.B. Lewis.

His feedback and pointers were very helpful and the images that he was choosing as my strong pieces were¬†different than¬†the one’s I had thought were.¬† He also suggested that I follow a “post and Rail” theme to the book, meaning that you intermingle strong “Post” pieces with the weaker “Rail” pieces.¬† That’s not to say that the “rail” pieces shouldn’t be just as high quality.

I hope this information has helped you in setting up your illustration portfolio.  Feel free to add a comment.  Thanks for visiting!

Lorraine Dey

illustrator – Deystudio, LLC (www.deystudio.com)
(click on the “about” tab above to see more about Deystudio, LLC)
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FREE Vector of the month from Deystudio, LLC:

click on image above to get a PDF file.

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This month’s featured site…”Brewer-Cantelmo Presentation Cases”

Quality Presentation Cases for illustrators and Photographers.

 
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Featured image for this month…(from my RF stock portfolio)

Vector vs Raster digital Art

Vector vs Raster digital Art

This month I thought I’d talk a little about the differences of digital vector art and digital raster art and why I choose one style over the other when illustrating a project.¬† Most of my children’s book art is done in Adobe Photoshop as raster digital files.¬† I choose this style for a more painted look to the finished art.¬† Using a Wacom tablet and stylus pen, I literally paint the image in a style of brush strokes similar to my traditional painting style in hopes of not looking too digitally produced.¬†

Pages 6 and 7¬†from¬†a picture book,¬†“The Rain Forest Party” written and illustrated by Lorraine Dey and available in the Fall of 2011 from Raven Tree Press.

I almost always create a pencil sketch first.  Then I scan the sketch to a digital JPG file on the computer and use the sketch as a basis for painting in the color and details in layers over the sketch.  Most of the work I create for istockphoto as royalty-free licensed art is done as a vector digital file.  I create a large amount of work in vector style with Adobe Illustrator CS for freelance clients as well.  Here is a vector chef that was commissioned by T.Marzetti Company for use on their website as well as large display signs.  A vector file is scalable to any size without losing clarity therefore it was a perfect choice for this project.  The style was requested by the client.

Both styles will begin as a sketch that is scanned into the computer before beginning final work on the illustration.  Vector art is perfect for technical and educational work such as instructional illustrations and charts.  The clean, sharp edges and ability to scale to any size make it ideal for everything from web icons to full size bill boards or vehicle graphics.

Here is a tutorial on using the Pen Tool in Adobe Illustrator… The basics of vector illustration.

Here is a quick and simple vector tutorial video…Light Ribs.

Here is a high-speed video of a raster digital painting being produced… Spider Man.

For more instruction on creating digital illustration images in various programs try a visit to Lynda.com   Enjoy!

Lorraine Dey

illustrator – Deystudio, LLC (www.deystudio.com)
(click on the “about” tab above to see more about Deystudio, LLC)
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FREE Vector of the month from Deystudio, LLC:

click on image above to get a PDF file.

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This month’s featured site…”The Association of Illustrators”

A resource for illustrators.

 
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Featured image for this month…(from my RF stock portfolio)